Dutch Meyer’s TCU Spread

Originally Published: November 12, 2007
OLD SCHOOL FOOTBALL NEWSLETTER
2007 – ISSUE 4 – By Hugh Wyatt – www.coachwyatt.com

Before you start firing off e-mails denouncing me for breaking my pledge to write about OLD SCHOOL FOOTBALL by writing about something with the word “SPREAD” in it… Relax. Bear with me.

The book shown above may look as if it’s the handbook for everything you dislike about where the game of football has gone since holding was virtually legalized, but it really is “Old School Football” – it’s more than 50 years old. A look inside it is enough to see that the author was giving us a peek at the future o the game.

It’s the work of long-time TCU coach Dutch Meyer, and it was published in 1952, following his retirement after 19 years as head coach of the Horned Frogs.

During those years, Dutch Meyer did as much as any man in football history to advance the passing game as a staple part of the offense and not simply a diversion, and in doing so, lay the groundwork for much of what we see in today’s modern “shotgun” offenses.

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Double T — Double Trouble

Special thanks to Jim Barg and Bryan Lane for the materials
Originally Published: October 22, 2007

“Revolutionary Football” — 1953

By Vassa Cate
Head Football Coach, Waycross High, Waycross, GA

Yes, the double-T is double trouble and with the clear interpretation that the rules committee has now put upon the use of the double quarterback, look for us to come out with more than just a few scattered plays from that formation.

For several years we fooled around with it here at Waycross and were really sold on the set. The officials, though, took a dim view of the way that we liked to line up the boys with both quarterbacks up and under, one on each cheek of the center. At the pivot, we tried to get big boys who could really stretch out, but that was not always possible. Because of this, we used fewer and fewer double-T plays. Now that a player is considered to a be a yard behind the line if there is daylight between the back and the lineman, we can put both boys up and under as far as we want as long as there is no contact. Therefore, we think that we can operate effectively again.

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Principles of the Double T

Special thanks to Jim Barg and Bryan Lane for the materials
Originally Published: October 1, 2007

“Revolutionary Football” — 1953

By Herbert “Swede” Phillips

With the defense rapidly catching up with the T formation offense, some coaches are turning to the single wingback formation, substituting power and deception for speed and quickness. Others will seek variations of the T; such as, the spread T, or the T with two quarterbacks — the Double T. This last-named formation is the one with which I have experimented extensively and to which I turned when my regular brand of T proved to be too weak.

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Football Offense of 1939 in High Schools-Part 9

Special thanks to Jim Barg for the materials and Guy Savoie for the text conversion
Originally Published: September 17, 2007

Athletic Journal — 1939

Wyoming

Diagram 82 is a forward lateral pass play run from a single wing-back with an unbalanced line and the ends out. Five, 11 and 1 go down into the secondary as decoys; the center and 6 team on the right guard; 9 and 10 team on the defensive left guard; 8 pulls out of the line as though to lead the interference and continues around to await a lateral; 2 hesitates then steps over the line and awaits the pass from 4; after receiving the pass, 2 laterals to 8; 3 protects the passer; 4, after passing, runs into the flat to protect the lateral against interception.

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Football Offense of 1939 in High Schools-Part 8

Special thanks to Jim Barg for the materials and Guy Savoie for the text conversion
Originally Published: August 27, 2007

Athletic Journal — 1939

Utah

In Diagram 70 we have a forward pass play from the short-punt formation. Five takes the right tackle while 6 is working on the right guard with the help of the center; 7 and 9 pull out to lead the interference in order to give the appearance of a wide sweep; 10 and 11 work on the left guard and tackle respectively; 1 meets the left end as he charges in; the ball is snapped to 3 who follows 2, 7 and 9 to his right. Suddenly he stops and passes across to 4 who has cut out to the right side of the secondary. Read More

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